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This tag is associated with 6 posts

India’s Daughter: The Interview

I’d like to use the controversial recent documentary India’s Daughter to discuss the documentary film interview. The film relates the story and fallout surrounding the gang-rape and subsequent death of Jyoti Singh, who was attacked on a bus while returning home from the cinema with a male friend in south Delhi. The incident provoked outrage … Continue reading

These Birds Walk

“First-time directors Omar Mullick and Bassam Tariq intended to make a documentary about Abdul Sattar Edhi, a philanthropist who has opened literally hundreds of facilities for Pakistan’s impoverished citizens; but when Edhi suggested they focus on his work rather than on him, they shifted their focus to an ambulance driver employed at one of his … Continue reading

Casablanca Calling & issues of cultural and religious access

Casablanca Calling was shown as part of the DOK Leipzig festival on Tuesday afternoon. I acted as moderator at the screening and was lucky enough to have the opportunity to talk to Hilary, the producer, about some of the issues she encountered when making the film. Access is something that many documentary film-makers struggle with, … Continue reading

Die Geschichte vom weinenden Kamel/The Story of the Weeping Camel

A Bactrian camel mother gives birth to a rare white foal and refuses to bond with her baby. The camel farmers, who live in a yurt in the vast expanse of the Gobi desert, are at their wits’ end as to what to do. “The mother must see her son!” proclaims Odgoo, mother of three. … Continue reading

The rise of the documentary novel

I touched on this briefly in my post about William Dalrymple’s wonderful book Nine Lives. However, the documentary novel has the power to delight and also inform, much as its film counterpart does. Whilst not visually anthropological, it is linguistically so. Darja Mazi-Leskovar reminds us that “literature has always relied on facts to make fictional … Continue reading